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 WINTER SALT WATER FISHING 

Spinning, Casting and Fly Rod

https://myfwc.com/research/



SALTWATER FLY FISHING

Saltwater fly fishing is typically done with heavier tackle than that which is used for freshwater or Bass/ Trout fishing, both to handle the larger, more powerful fish, and to accommodate the casting of larger and heavier flies.  Salt water fly fishing typically employs the use of wet flies resembling baitfish, crabs, shrimp and other forage. 

However, saltwater fish can also be caught with poppers and other surface lure similar to those used for freshwater bass fishing, though much larger in the flats and shallows, and low tides  Saltwater species sought and caught with fly tackle include: bonefish, redfish or red drum, permit, snook, spotted sea trout, tuna, dorado, aka mahi-mahi, sailfish, tarpon, striped bass, salmon, giant trevally and marlin. 

Offshore saltwater species are usually attracted to the fly by “ chumming” with small baitfish, or "teasing" the fish to the boat by trolling a large hookless lure (Billfish are most often caught using this method).

Many saltwater species, particularly large, fast and powerful fish, are not easily slowed down by “ palming” the hand on the reel.  With braided line slowing the fish by squeezing the line can result in a bloody cut…

Instead, a purpose-made saltwater reel for these species must have a powerful drag system and Salt water will ruin anything, so rinse your reels after use and keep well lubed. 

Furthermore, saltwater reels purpose-made for larger fish must be larger, heavier, and corrosion-resistant; a typical high-quality HD saltwater reel can range up to $500.00 or more. 


IMPORTANT:   Corrosion-resistant equipment is key to durability in all types of saltwater fishing, regardless of the size and power of the target species. Rinsing gear in fresh water is essential after usage.  Reels with removable spools have advantages, but expensive in some cases.

Saltwater fly fishing is most often done from a boat, either a shallow draft flat boat is used to pursue species such as bonefish, redfish, permit and tarpon in shallow waters, or from larger offshore boats for pursuing sailfish, tuna, dorado, marlin and other pelagic’s and most popular methodology may be done from shore, such as wading flats for bonefish or redfish or surf fishing for striped bass and other assorted fish. 

Typically, most trout fly fisherman need to practice new skills to catch saltwater fish on a fly rod. Ocean fish are usually harder to catch. They can be extremely spooky, and much larger. Trout fisherman need to practice with at least an 8 weight fly rod and accurately cast the line 30–90 feet if they are going to have success—particularly in the flat areas fishing for bonefish, redfish, permit, tarpon, jacks and more.  They can be spooky but when they hit, it’s an explosion.

Hooks for saltwater flies must also be extremely durable and corrosion resistant. Most saltwater hooks are made of stainless steel but the strongest (though less corrosion resistant) hooks are of high-carbon steel. Typically, these hooks vary from size #8 to #2 for bonefish and smaller nearshore species, to size #3/0 to #5/0 for the larger offshore species.


https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/FLFFWCC/bulletins/27d890d #Florida #fishing 

SNOOK TO RECREATIONAL HARVEST MAR. 1 IN SOME GULF WATERS 

  • The recreational harvest season for snook opens March 1 in some Gulf waters, including Escambia through Hernando counties, and waters south of Gordon Pass in Collier County through Monroe County (also includes Everglades National Park). 

  • Snook remains catch-and-release only in state waters from the Hernando/Pasco county line south through Gordon Pass in Collier County (includes all of Pasco County, Tampa Bay and Hillsborough County) through May 31, 2021, in response to the impacts of a prolonged red tide that occurred in late 2017 through early 2019. Because snook has a May 1-Aug. 31 annual season closure, this species would reopen Sept. 1, 2021. 

  • Unique to the region, snook are one of the many reasons Florida is the Fishing Capital of the World. Seasonal harvest closures and anglers using proper handling methods when practicing catch-and-release help conserve Florida’s valuable snook populations and can ensure the species’ abundance for anglers today and generations to come.



GRAY TRIGGERFISH OPENS MAR. 1 IN GULF STATE AND FEDERAL WATERS

https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/FLFFWCC/bulletins/27dc3ce #Florida #fishing 

  • The recreational gray triggerfish season reopens to harvest in Gulf state and federal waters March 1, and will remain open through May 1, closing to harvest May 2, 2020.  

  • If you plan to fish for gray triggerfish in Gulf state or federal waters, excluding Monroe County, from a private recreational vessel, you must sign up as a Gulf Reef Fish Angler (annual renewal is required). To learn more, visit MyFWC.com/Marine and click on “Recreational Regulations” and “Gulf Reef Fish Survey” under “Reef Fish.” Sign up today at GoOutdoorsFlorida.com. 

  • Learn more about gray triggerfish regulations at MyFWC.com/Marine by clicking on “Recreational Regulations” and “Triggerfish,” which is under the “Reef Fish” tab. 

  • NOAA Fisheries recently announced that the Gulf recreational gray triggerfish fishery is estimated to meet its quota in early May, prompting an early quota closure in federal waters of May 2. At its February meeting, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) approved also closing recreational harvest of gray triggerfish in state waters when Gulf federal waters close.


MORE SALT WATER PROCESSES, CUSTOMS, IDEAS AND COURTESIES

  • Saltwater, by boat,  deep or pier fishing is a different set of rules.  Mostly seasonal and size limitations, you need the state chart or a lawyer to figure the rules and limits on time and size.  My conventional fishing gear like spinning and larger heavier casting reels, usually live bait and some lures work for that in the inner-coastal, bridges and offshore.

  • Florida is blessed with mangroves , flats and good weather year round that suits the fly-fisherman.  Winter can offer great fishing opportunities for some of the state’s most sought-after fish species. As the temperatures drop, you’ll spot many anglers, following spotted sea trout to fresher water, where the fish congregate in large schools closer to warmer water.   

  • Be aware of the area you will be fishing and local fish you might catch. Know the regulations for your target species and make sure you have all the proper gear. Determining ahead of time which fish you are going to keep versus which fish you will release is an easy step to take. Knowing which fish he plans to release helps to get those fish back in the water quickly, increasing survival and benefitting the fish population. 

  • Barbless circle hooks – Are 90% more likely to hook a fish in the mouth. Hooking a fish in the mouth reduces internal harm and decreases de-hooking time, getting the fish back in the water faster and increasing its chance of survival.

  •  De-hooking tool – Allows anglers to quickly release their catch while minimizing fish and self injuries and handling time. Just take the hemostat and crush the barb, then if you hoof your face it will be easy to remove.
     Correct weight tackle – Using tackle heavy enough to land a fish quickly is important so fish are less exhausted and more able to avoid predators upon release.
  •  Knotless, rubber-coated net – These support the weight of the fish while removing a minimal amount of slime, which protects the fish from infection.

  • Make sure to reel the fish in as quickly as possible especially a big one, by managing the drag tension. Horsing a trout into the boat can usually result in additional tearing of the area they are hooked, especially around the mouth.   Work them in as they tire and keep tension on the line to prevent a hook release. 

  • Anglers should always use a net for landing medium-to-large trout and dip/wet any measuring board with water before laying the fish on the board.    Avoid removing large fish from water. If you must remove them, support their weight horizontally to prevent damage to their internal organs.  And take pictures of your catch while it is in the water. This puts less stress on the fish and the fish will look bigger.

  •  If a net is needed to land or control a fish, always use a knotless, rubber-coated landing net.   Return the fish to the water as quickly as possible. One of the major factors in the survival of a released fish is how much time it spends out of the water.   Be sure to wet your hands before handling a fish to prevent damaging its protective slime coating. Don’t use gloves or towels, as this will remove the protective slime.   Never hold a fish by the gill cover or eyes and hold fish horizontally to support their internal organs.  If possible, keep the fish in the water while removing the hook. 

  • Gripping devices can be effective for controlling and handling fish, especially ones with sharp teeth. Grip behind the lower lip and support the weight of the fish in a horizontal position.  If the fish has swallowed the hook, cut the line as close to the hook as possible. Attempting to remove the hook can do more harm than good. Use non-stainless-steel hooks since they eventually dissolve or pass naturally.
  •  Place the fish in the water and allow it to swim away on its own; do not toss the fish back.  If fish is in shock, Revive fish that do not swim away immediately or appear lethargic.    Place fish in the water head first – it is easiest to hold one hand on the bottom lip or tail and one hand under the belly of the fish.    Move the fish forward in the water – this allows the water to be flow through the mouth and over the gills. The fish must face the direction of water flow.  
     Use a figure-8 motion to move the fish forward constantly, ensuring water continues to flow over the gills. Never jerk fish back and forth, since this action prevents water from properly flowing through the gills.

  •  For fish caught in deep water with signs of barotrauma, use a descending device to return fish to depth or vent the fish by inserting a sharpened, hollow tube at a 45-degree angle, one inch behind the base of the pectoral fin.

  • The steps you take on the water today can help positively impact the future of your Florida fish populations! Dropping temperatures don’t have to mean a drop in the survival of the fish you release. To learn more about proper catch-and-release techniques, visit     MyFWC.com/FishHandling